The Laws of War: Its Relevance to Philippine Courts - ACCESS MCLE

ACCESS MCLE

In alliance with Adamson University, College of Law

The Laws of War: Its Relevance to Philippine Courts

1,200.00

International Law

2 Credit Units

Hon. (Ret.) Justice Adolfo S. Azcuna

The Laws of War: Its Relevance to Philippine Courts

Why is there a need for rules to govern war?
CATEGORY

International Law

CREDIT UNIT

2

DURATION

2:07:03

LAUNCH DATE

October 2022

ABOUT THE COURSE

The rules of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) impact our turbulent existence. There are armed conflicts everywhere, thus no responsible citizen, much less a lawyer worth her salt, can afford to be ignorant of them. As judges and lawyers, you will be called upon to address situations of armed conflict in our country. 

A solid knowledge of the fundamentals is a sine qua non in today’s world. And the fiber your knowledge, the more you will be able to deal with real, live breaches on the ground that will, like it or not, come before you. 

At the end of this course, you should be able to: 

  • List the conventional or treaty sources of International Humanitarian Law,
  • Explain the core crimes listed in the IHL, 
  • Discuss the relevance of IHL in the Philippine courts, and
  • Summarize the historical development of IHL.

Course Status

AVAILABLE

Course price

₱886

when you avail the Full Compliance (36 Units) bundle

₱1,200

Regular price for 1 credit unit course

LECTURER

Hon. (Ret.) Justice Adolfo S. Azcuna

Associate Justice (Ret.), Supreme Court of the Philippines

Justice Adolfo S. Azcuna was born in Katipunan, Zamboanga Del Norte on February 16, 1939, the son of Felipe B. Azcuna and Carmen S. Sevilla. He received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with academic honors, at the Ateneo de Manila in 1959 and the degree of Bachelor of Laws, cum laude, at the same institution in 1962. He was admitted to the Philippine Bar in 1963, placing 4th in the 1962 bar examinations. He forthwith embarked on a government career as Assistant Private Secretary of then Presiding Justice Jose P. Bengzon of the Court of Appeals in 1963 and, thereafter, upon the appointment of the latter to the Supreme Court in 1964, as his Private Secretary.